Country Chic Windchime

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Spring cleaning doesn’t just mean dusting and washing.  It may also include upcycling odd bits and pieces into something new, fun and original that will brighten your home or garden.  In this case, I used my stash of skeleton keys culled from years of living in old homes and are useless now.  I also had a number of old and broken necklaces that were collecting dust, so I combined them to make a sweet, country chic wind chime that makes a lovely sound, but not so loud to keep you up at night.  The clanger is  pewter  from a broken key chain.  Yes I am a bit of a hoarder.  I also have a large stash of buttons taken from every shirt I’ve owned.  Then there are the shrinky dinks my daughter made when eight or nine.  They didn’t make it into the final wind chime, but they might in my next one.  I love the idea that they are a family memory and transparent, so they will catch the light.

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Supplies:

  • 1 Basswood, Country Round
  • 8 keys (any kind, you can use contemporary ones as well as skeleton keys)
  • 4-5 broken bead necklaces or 3 tubes of 8/0 seed beads in any color (I used clear silver-lined seed beads)
  • assorted buttons
  • 8 #114 eye screws
  • 4 #14 eye screws
  • 49 strand flex beading wire fro necklaces
  • 2 ft of chain
  • 5 split rings
  • a package of crimping beads to correspond with beading wire
  • needle nose pliers
  • wire cutters
  • bead crimp pliers (optional, but does make the crimping easier)
  • Drill (or hammer and nail to start the holes).
  • Ruler

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Step 1:  Drill 8 holes one one side and 4 on the other.   You could also start the holes with a hammer and nail.  Screw the 8 smaller eye screws in place. Flip it over and screw in the 4 larger eye screws.

Step 2: Cut 8 pieces of wire.  Thread the eye  screw with the wire. Add a crimp bead.  Thread the wire  back through the crimp bead.  Pull taught, so the crimp bead is flush against the eye screw.  Leave only a one or two inch tail.  Crimp the bead. Pull on the wire to be sure the crimp is tight and secure.  begin threading the wire with beads.  I use seed beads, buttons, stone chips from a broken necklace and assorted beads from other necklaces.  I ended with at 4 inches , added three seed beads, then a crimp bead and a key.  I threaded the wire back through the crimp bead and pulled taught (easier to do with the needle nose pliers) and then crimped the crimp bead. Trim away access wire with the wire clippers.

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Step 3:  Proceed in the same fashion with the eye screws along the outer ring.  The final eye screw is in the center and is for the clanger.  I used a large key chain pendant made of pewter.   So on that one I ended with the clanger rather than a key.

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Step 4:  Cut 4 equal lengths of chain.  Attach the split rings to the ends of the chains and attach to the large eye screws.  Gather the 4 chains together with one large split ring.

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Your done, now hang it on your porch or in a window where it may catch the light and a breeze.  I think of this as jewelry for the garden.

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Thank you for joining me today as I share another craft for the garden ! I hope you’ll check out all the other great products Walnut Hollow has to offer and that you’ll stop by and visit me at Craft with a Capital C!

Find the supplies to make this project and more at WalnutHollow.com:

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Lindsay Obermeyer is an artist, designer, author and educator with a passion for the crafts.  For twenty five years, she’s been exhibiting her work in galleries and museums around the world. She currently resides in St. Louis with her daughter and two zany papillons in a 100 year old house surrounded by an ever evolving garden.

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